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Platini against goal-line technology

UEFA President Michel Platini has reiterated his stance against the introduction of goal-line technology in football, despite FIFA President Sepp Blatter's willingness to introduce it.

In July the International Football Association Board (IFAB) gave the green light for the use of the technology, receiving backing from Blatter, while it is also set to be introduced in the Premier League for the start of the 2013/2014 season.

However, Platini is refusing to allow its use in UEFA competitions, instead preferring additional assistant referees, such as those seen in Euro 2012 and the Europa League.

"You will never convince me on technology and I will not change at the age of 57. Technology assisting referee: I say, no," Platini told the Evening Standard. "My idea is to help referees by putting up more referees."

The former France captain believes additional assistant referees are the only way forward and is hoping to persuade the IFAB to allow the goal-line officials to make gestures to help the referee in making decisions - which they currently ban.

The introduction of additional assistant referees have not won too many plaudits and has done little to persuade people that goal-line technology is not needed.

At Euro 2012 an additional assistant referees failed to spot Marko Devic's "goal that never was" for Ukraine against England. Blatter firmed up his stance after that incident, tweeting: ""After last night's match #GLT is no longer an alternative but a necessity."

However, despite criticism, Platini is keeping faith in the system, remaining adamant that goal-line technology will never truly work due to the cost and efforts of actually putting it in place.

"How can we put goal-line technology in every match?" he said. "We will have to spend a lot of money. National associations will not do that."

When told of the Premier League's plans to introduce it he said: "Fine, let England do it as a trial and see if it works."

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