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Marco van Basten and FIFA's sin bin proposal backed by DFL

The German Football League (DFL) has backed Marco van Basten's plans to introduce sin bins.

Last week, Van Basten, who is FIFA's chief officer for technical development, said rule changes are under consideration to make the game more attractive.

Among the proposals was to introduce a time penalty of five or 10 minutes and replace yellow cards to punish teams in a match rather than after a number of matches.

That idea has now been backed by DFL CEO Christian Seifert, who said: "I think it makes sense that football adapts to the technical options we have these days.

"Sin bins make much more sense for the match than yellow cards."

Citing the success of recent changes to the game like the introduction of goal-line technology or the use of vanishing pray have been a success, Seifert added that we could also see an "automatised offside detection" in the future.

Earlier this week, the DFL announced plans to use video assistant referees (VAR) from next season.

VAR will only be used for clear matters and in four separate situations -- for irregularities in the case of a goal decision, penalty box situations regarding penalty calls, red card offences unnoticed by the referee, and in cases of mistaken identity over a yellow or red card.

Stephan Uersfeld is the Germany correspondent for ESPN FC. Follow him on Twitter @uersfeld.

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